What was the most inspiring Shoujo Anime or Manga for artists?

Topic started by takashichea on Aug. 12, 2012. Last post by PenguinDust 1 year, 11 months ago.
Post by takashichea (11,065 posts) See mini bio Level 25
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Typical Shoujo style
Typical Shoujo style

The inspiration behind this question came when I learned that Hiro Mashima (Fairy Tail), Eiichiro Oda (One Piece), Tite Kubo (Bleach), Masashi Kishimoto (Naruto), Hidaeki Sorachi (Gintama), and most shonen artists who commented that they were inspired by Akira Toriyama's Dragon Ball work in their interviews or artist comments. Plus, the concepts and cliches are recycled throughout Shonen series and many of these works reference Dragon Ball in some form.

I was wondering what was the most inspirational Shoujo series that most Shoujo artists look up to.

I guess Sailor Moon or Cardcaptor Sakura, but I didn't think so since not much anime or manga series imitated or made references to the shows. I might have to check some of the mangaka for their inspirations.

What do you folks think is the most inspirational Shoujo work for shoujo manga artists?

Post by PenguinDust (1,008 posts) See mini bio Level 13

My first thought was of Riyoko Ikeda (The Rose of Versailles - 1979) but it probably goes back before that. Yumiko Igarashi illustrated Candy Candy in 1975 and Ariyoshi Kyoko created Swan in 1976. Before that Moto Hagio was drawing Poe no Ichizoku/The Poe Clan (1972). From what I read, there are two groups of recognized influential shoujo creators; "The Year 24 Flower Group" and the "Post Year 24" group. This refers to the approximate birth years of the original group; 1949 (Showa calender year 24). Those in the first group are people like Ikeda and Hagio. Keiko Takemiya who wrote Toward the Terra is also in that group even if that particular story isn't shoujo. Women like them paved the way for other significant female manga writers and artists such as Rumiko Takahashi (Mermaid Saga), Naoko Takeuchi (Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon) and Yuu Watase (Fushigi Yuugi).

Moto Hagio's 1972 manga sensation, Poe no Ichizoku was about vampires and the humans who love them.
Moto Hagio's 1972 manga sensation, Poe no Ichizoku was about vampires and the humans who love them.

To answer your question, my guess would be Moto Hagio since many of the themes in her works epitomize shoujo as a genre. I found a good list of early shoujo manga of merit HERE if you're interested.

Post by takashichea (11,065 posts) See mini bio Level 25
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@PenguinDust:

Thanks! I can't believe the answers were right in Anime Vice.

Osamu Tezuka is the father of anime while Moto Hagio is the mother of Shoujo and Akira Toriyama is the father of Shonen. That's very interesting. It's strange that no one mentions Moto Hagio much.

Thanks for the recommended Shoujo manga list. and the others wanted to do a weekly Shoujo blog series. We just didn't have time. I hope to jump start it soon, but I don't read or watch a lot of Shoujo genre.

Post by PenguinDust (1,008 posts) See mini bio Level 13

@takashichea said:

Osamu Tezuka is the father of anime while Moto Hagio is the mother of Shoujo and Akira Toriyama is the father of Shonen. That's very interesting. It's strange that no one mentions Moto Hagio much.

Glad to help. To be fair however, shoujo isn't as popular in the West as more action-packed offerings, so it's not too surprising. It's hard to sell toys and cartoons about historical romances or worse yet, boy-love. There's more to shoujo than that, of course, but even non-sexualized romantic comedies are a hard sell to mainstream anime fandom. Many of us were introduced to anime through action shows and that's great, but I wonder if we would have taken to the art form so passionately if our earliest memories were of something simpler like Kodocha. I've always felt it's important to explore anime beyond what's familiar and comfortable. Like any storytelling medium, there's a diverse wealth of creativity out there if we're willing to give it a chance.

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