Anime Vice News

Almost Otaku: Is It Too Late To Stop Scanlations?

Can progress be made at this point?

So we’ve talked about scanlations more than a couple times here on Anime Vice, and that controversy’s continuing unabated. The latest turn in the ongoing drama (as Honolulu's Star Advertiser and CBR’S Robot 6 blog spin it) seems to be that the “all-star coalition” of manga publishers has made some headway in getting major scanlation sites like Onemanga, Animea and MangaFox to take down links to scans on their front pages. However, if you still had urls for the pages... well,they still work, and there's actually a good chance that they’ll turn up in a Google search or in an app compiler. Basically, the sites kept what they had - - they just stopped advertising it.

I’ll agree that eradicating piracy at this point will be basically like trying to plug up a leaky dam with your thumb. Just as soon as you’ve got one leak sealed on one end, there will be five more leaks popping up on the other end. However, I’ll also agree with Robot 6’s assessment that it isn’t impossible for this coalition to make significant progress. I’ll reckon it’s just going to take time, patience and a dedicated staff who’s savy to the kinds of subtle tricks described above.

Lissa Patillo’s column rebutting a lot of the scanlation-related arguments has been popping up a lot in these discussions. After reading it again, I’ll say that it’s that I’m definitely siding with the allied publishers (as if there were ever any doubt about that.) As a published writer, myself, I don’t think I’ll surprise anybody by saying that I sympathize with the creators’ rights in this fray. I’ve come across torrents of my work online before and, believe me, I don’t find it flattering to know that they're out there.

Anyway, maybe we're all missing the point here, so I'm definitely curious to hear what the Anime Vice community has to say about this. Do you figure these sites still have the right to put these pages up, and ceasing advertisement,like they have, is all they ought to acquiesce to? Or is there more to it?

-- Tom Pinchuk is the writer of UNIMAGINABLE for Arcana Studios and HYBRID BASTARDS! for Archaia. HYBRID BASTARDS! is available  here and UNIMAGINABLE is available here for pre-order on Amazon.com.  

FoxxFireArt moderator on June 25, 2010 at 1:02 a.m.
VIZ Media is one of the largest problems that leads to scanlations. Their utter contempt for Japanese culture in mangas is border line bigoted. More often then not. They do everything they can to remove as much Japanese references from many series where the story at times depends on them or it's just part of the culture.
 
With Naruto, they refuse to use the term "sensei" for any of the teachers. It's always "Master", but the anime version uses "Sensei". Both are VIZ productions. Also, they call all the justu for the manga version "art of", such as the anime may say "Shadow Clone Jutsu". The manga will say "Art of the Shadow Clone".  If both are made by VIZ, why don't they match? Why is their anime more authentic then their manga?
In One Piece, they removed all uses of the word "God" and replaced it with "Kami". I looked it up. This was not a change they made in Naruto where Pain referred to himself as a God.

With Detective Conan, they completely removed the Japanese names of the main cast and replaced them all with European style names. In that case they ripped away the ethnic origins of the entire cast. They are no longer Japanese. How many Japanese families have someone named Harley Hartwell or Richard Moore in them unless they married into the family?  This is a story that almost completely takes place in Japan, with a few short chapters that occur in New York City in a flash back. Japanese culture often plays a huge role in the solution of the cases. Even how Japanese kanji are used can play a major part to the solutions.
Here is the funny thing though. The manga keeps all the Japanese names of all the suspects and the killers. So a suspect and killer is always Japanese, but no heroes can be. I think they kept maybe one or two police officers in the manga with their Japanese names.
 
VIZ is just a bad over all publisher. They think they can get by poor quality by just producing as many as they possibly can. They often flat out refuse to even try to produce an authentic product. If they wont provide any alternative or option to their alterations. I have no problem going to scanlations alone to find the real story. It's not my preferred choice. It's just the only one provided to me as a consumer since I want the story the writer is making. Not the one that VIZ changes.
When they alter story content and character names. They are basically saying that they do not even want the scanlation audience. They shouldn't complain when that audience doesn't want their edits.

Many of their alterations are just flat out stupid and pointless. Such as how for Detective Conan they renamed two of the biggest known villains of the series from Gin and Vodka to Melkior and Kaspar. In this case they took two easily recognized English words and replaced them with obscure biblical names.
 
I would feel vastly different about them if they would just provide an alternative to their edits and censorship. How is that asking too much? What are they doing publishing manga if they don't want manga culture in the product.
It's akin to having the license to produce Budweiser to German, but taking out the alcohol.
 
I used to think that if I just buy the series they don't edit so much. Perhaps they will realize that people don't want that and start making changes. Well, how the hell do I do that when the two series I want the most that they make just so happen to be two that have the highest amount of edits? What, I'm suppose to buy mangas from them that I'm not that interested in on just the hope they will stop editing the ones I want the most? All for what they should've been doing in the first place.
 
The only reason why I cut FUNimation a break is because they provide me an option. If I don't like their edits for the dubs. I just have to hit a button on the DVDs and get the subtitles that aren't edited or altered. That's all I ask. An option and an alternative.
I used to watch One Piece on fan subs sites exclusively when 4Kids was the producers to the US. Once FUNimation started handling the anime. It became far more authentic. I now use FUNimations' site nearly exclusively for all my anime needs, and I'm one of their biggest cheerleaders.
 
I realize that there is an issue of creator rights, but what about the audience right to have the most authentic product possible? It's Japan that is getting the real story. In the US, we are getting an edited and altered version thanks to VIZ.
I make no excuses for pirating US comics in the country. The audience is getting the real story that was written by the author. Names, Events, and all. Not an altered version. In that case it's the best product possible.

I support publishers like Del Rey and Yen Press. They do great translations and a very authentic product. I buy their manags all the time. I currently own every Negima! published in the US. I try and encourage people to buy from these publishers.
 
I don't want to be against VIZ, but I'm not going to support a publisher that butchers my favorite stories without offering alternatives. As you can see. I feel somewhat passionate on the subject. lol
Godoton June 25, 2010 at 3:15 a.m.
@FoxxFireArt said:

Many of their alterations are just flat out stupid and pointless. Such as how for Detective Conan they renamed two of the biggest known villains of the series from Gin and Vodka to Melkior and Kaspar. In this case they took two easily recognized English words and replaced them with obscure biblical names.
 

I agree on all counts except this one. What sounds foreign and exotic to Japanese ears in this case (i.e. English) just sounds utterly stupid to us; it is because they are easily recognised English words that they changed them. Melkior retains the association to alcohol (a Melchior is a wine bottle that holds 18 litres), and I guess the translator extrapolated from there and chose another of the Three Wise Men as a name. Shame they didn't choose Balthazar, that would have fit being a wine bottle size AND one of the Three Wise Men.
FoxxFireArt moderator on June 25, 2010 at 3:36 a.m.
@Godot: 
In the Japanese anime and manga they are saying literally "Gin (jin)" and "Vodka (botoka)". Those are the Romanized version of English words. It's how they say the English words Gin and Vodka in Japanese. They are saying this in English in the Japanese version.
There is no valid reason these English words had to be replaced with such obscure terms. It's utterly Idiotic. I heard there was even an editing mistake in one volume where someone screwed up in once scene and used the name "Gin" once.
 
This even contradicts a joke that the villain Vermouth makes later on when she makes her first real appearance about how her and Vodka could make a Martini together. Vodka is all confused until Gin explains to him that a Vodka Martini is made by mixing vodka and dry vermouth. It was kind of a sexual pun.
Godoton June 25, 2010 at 4:09 a.m.
@FoxxFireArt said:
" @Godot:  In the Japanese anime and manga they are saying literally "Gin (jin)" and "Vodka (botoka)". Those are the Romanized version of English words. It's how they say the English words Gin and Vodka in Japanese. They are saying this in English in the Japanese version. There is no valid reason these English words had to be replaced with such obscure terms. It's utterly Idiotic.
I realise they are literally saying Jin and Botoka. It doesn't stop it being utterly bizarre when spoken in English; they will have different connotations in different languages. As for the joke being mangled, that's unfortunate, but it's a part of translation and localisation; it's unlikely that the translators at the time even considered that a pun would be made of the names, as all the manga wouldn't be translated in one go but in separate volumes. Curiously enough, what DID happen at that part in the manga (with Vermouth)?
 
I'm not defending their decision to change the names, but I realise that translation can be a pretty miserable job; damned if you change something, damned if you don't. They have to bear in mind how many people are going to be put off by Japanese names, weird villain names like Gin or Vodka and unexplained Japanese culture, versus the small (but vocal) minority who will raise high hell about every change because they have previous knowledge of the manga.
FoxxFireArt moderator on June 25, 2010 at 4:24 a.m.
@Godot: 
I just don't see your point. How are common words like Gin and Vodka difficult for the English audience?  It's no translation issue. They are more common then the variety of poisons that are used throughout the series. They are being said in English in the Japanese versions. Just use it in English for the English version as well. If you are a Japanese translator for English mangas and you find these easily recognized English words confusing. That person needs to find another job.
 
In that scene of the manga Vermouth was again in her one her many disguises as a waitress at a restaurant. Naturally, Gin realized who she really was right away.
 
The theme of all the bad guys of this series is that they have the code names of liquors. Gin, Vodka, Vermouth, Chianti, and Bourbon to name a few. Thanks to VIZ. That theme is destroyed. Imagine the Homunculi from Fullmetal Alchemist being named after something other then sins, but the only switched Lust and Gluttony. The word Gluttony isn't used as much as Gin in the English language.
empressdonnaon June 25, 2010 at 4:28 a.m.
I must be honest here and say that I haven't bought much manga over the past few years.  
 
This isn't because that I get scanlations online and more the fact that a lot of the manga I started to buy as a teenager as either become hard to find or is now out of print. 
 
Maybe that is due to the drop in manga and anime popularity in the UK or maybe it's more the fact that the manga stores are trying to stock as many copies of the more popular mangas and only keep a volume or two of the less popular ones. 
 
I know that the first problem listed above can be solved by buying my manga off of the internet, but what about those younger people who like manga that cannot? That is where scanlations come in for the manga loving crowd. 
 
Instead of searching bookshelves for manga or buying them online, they can easily find the volume they want to read and read it through a computer.  
 
Now saying that doesn't mean I condone it, but perhaps there should be an easier way to obtain harder to get manga? Like perhaps the big companies could publish a volume or two online after they've gone out-of-print or just as a test to see what happens? 
 
I know that wouldn't solve the problem of scanlation sites popping all over the internet or people not going to big companies sites for their manga, but it could be a start in the right direction, after all, even if every manga company sent cease and desist letters to every scanlator online, new ones would pop up on the internet to replace them and the cycle would go on.
Godoton June 25, 2010 at 4:33 a.m.
@FoxxFireArt said:
" @Godot: 
I just don't see your point. How are common words like Gin and Vodka difficult for the English audience?  It's no translation issue. They are more common then the variety of poisons that are used throughout the series. They are being said in English in the Japanese versions. Just use it in English for the English version as well. If you are a Japanese translator for English mangas and you find these easily recognized English words confusing. That person needs to find another job.
I meant that it is BECAUSE they are common that they were changed, not that they were difficult. They're no longer exotic, foreign words to have for a codename, but everyday words that are ridiculous to have as an infamous villain's name. English words may sound exotic to Japanese-speaking people, but not to other English-speaking people.
 
And what I meant about Vermouth's scene was whether or not the whole joke of mixing together was brushed under the rug, or they had made a new joke based on the biblical/wine size names.
FoxxFireArt moderator on June 25, 2010 at 4:46 a.m.
 My name is Gin too, but I got to keep my name. lol
 My name is Gin too, but I got to keep my name. lol
@Godot: 
That makes no blinkin' sense. That they were too common so couldn't be used. If that were true. I would have to smack someone who made that call.
 
You know what you do when you use common words as proper names. You Capitalized the first letter to make it a name. The same way how Ai's codename in when she was a member was Sherry.
The didn't have that same concern with Gin Ichimaru.
Godoton June 25, 2010 at 4:55 a.m.
@FoxxFireArt said:
"
 My name is Gin too, but I got to keep my name. lol
 My name is Gin too, but I got to keep my name. lol
@Godot: 
That makes no blinkin' sense. That they were too common so couldn't be used. If that were true. I would have to smack someone who made that call.
 
You know what you do when you use common words as proper names. You Capitalized the first letter to make it a name. The same way how Ai's codename in when she was a member was Sherry.
The didn't have that same concern with Gin Ichimaru. "
Because gin and vodka are common words in English, they don't have the connotation of "mysterious codename." Not that people would get confused between a character's name and a drink. And the Gin Ichimaru example doesn't really work, because his is a real name not named after the drink.
 
Also, thanks for telling me about capitalising proper nouns in order to distinguish them from concrete or abstract nouns! The More You Know, eh?
Whiskeyjackon June 25, 2010 at 5:58 a.m.
[Paraphrased]

"I don't like the editorial decisions Viz made while translating their series so I am going to use that as justification for denying them hundreds of dollars in sales and instead read illegal bootlegged translations online."


Because it surely would be better for the entire anime and manga industry if Viz just never bothered in the first place. Even though Viz is busting a nut bringing out One Piece at a break neck pace to catch up to the Japanese version, screw them for changing a name here and there. This is a niche industry that is shrinking in upon itself, and the only way it's going to hold steady is if there are always new fans, and Viz has a stranglehold on most of the most easily marketable and accessible material out there. I know I only got into anime and manga because of Viz bringing over Ranma and Battle Angel/Gunnm back in the day. Hell, Battle Angel's goofy name change from Gally to Alita even got referenced eventually in the original Japanese version. I knew the name change happened and I'm certain of other changes went through as well, but it didn't stop me from enjoying what was there, nor did it make me decide to steal either.

It's not like they went and Robotech'd an entire series and the only way one would understand what's going on is by going back to the original source and re-translating it.

I would feel vastly different about them if they would just provide an alternative to their edits and censorship. How is that asking too much? What are they doing publishing manga if they don't want manga culture in the product.


That is one of the most ridiculously un-pratical things I think I've heard all day. Granted, it's still early. I'm sure Viz, or any other anime company would LOVE to go through and do their job multiple times over just so a small handful of fans are happy.
 
 
*edit - To pull from this excellent post (full thing's linked in the original article and here)    
I realize it doesn't necessarily address your specific pet-peeves about name changes but still it's topical.

“But official translations are wrong! I like scanlations better!”

  Solution: Learn to read Japanese. Not as easy as we’d like sure, but you can’t go proclaiming which translation is ‘right’ when you yourself can’t understand the original. Simple solution is fundamentally simple?
Gaseroon June 25, 2010 at 6:32 a.m.
Its too late to stop scanlations, but it is certainly not too late to compete with them. 
 
Manga publishers could easily release scanlation programs (I say program so the content can be protected) that allow customers to browse their catalog of releases. They can do this with a subscription model or a-la-carte model of buying manga volumes (or maybe even chapters). The publisher could even offer discounts to customers who want to buy a hard copy of the manga after buying the digital one. There are many different ways to approach the problem, but is seems like the businessmen are afraid to move.
 
iTunes fought back against music piracy a decade ago, why is it so hard for others to accept a new business model?
sickVisionz moderator on June 25, 2010 at 7:44 a.m.
@Gasero: That's my opinion on it.  The cat's out of the bag on stopping scanlations but I'm surprised that a major player hasn't stepped in to offer a service similar to what sites like OneManga offer. 
 
It might just be my collection but it seems like Viz is a huge player in the US manga industry (over 80% of my manga comes from them).  If they offered a Crunchyroll for manga I'd definitely be on board since they release most of the stuff I want to read anyways. 
 
I've never found their translations to be indecipherable, insulting or unenjoyable like others (or other) so I'd welcome their entry into digital delivery with open arms.
Chromaon June 25, 2010 at 11:21 a.m.
@Gasero said:
" Its too late to stop scanlations, but it is certainly not too late to compete with them.   Manga publishers could easily release scanlation programs (I say program so the content can be protected) that allow customers to browse their catalog of releases. They can do this with a subscription model or a-la-carte model of buying manga volumes (or maybe even chapters). The publisher could even offer discounts to customers who want to buy a hard copy of the manga after buying the digital one. There are many different ways to approach the problem, but is seems like the businessmen are afraid to move.  iTunes fought back against music piracy a decade ago, why is it so hard for others to accept a new business model? "
My sentiments exactly. 
FoxxFireArt moderator on June 25, 2010 at 11:40 a.m.
@Whiskeyjack said:
"

I would feel vastly different about them if they would just provide an alternative to their edits and censorship. How is that asking too much? What are they doing publishing manga if they don't want manga culture in the product.


That is one of the most ridiculously un-pratical things I think I've heard all day. Granted, it's still early. I'm sure Viz, or any other anime company would LOVE to go through and do their job multiple times over just so a small handful of fans are happy.

“But official translations are wrong! I like scanlations better!”

  Solution: Learn to read Japanese. Not as easy as we’d like sure, but you can’t go proclaiming which translation is ‘right’ when you yourself can’t understand the original. Simple solution is fundamentally simple? "
If it's just a small hand full of fans, why are scanlations such a large problem then? It's not impractical to publish manga to what is the base audience of manga.
 
There is no point in supporting a publisher that doesn't put out an authentic product as designed by the original author. There are publishers who do put out authentic products, such as Del Rey and Yen Press. They are well worth support. 
VIZ wouldn't have to do their job multiple times if they would get it right the first time.
 
I can proclaim which translations is right or wrong when what is translated isn't even remotely close to what it is for the Japanese version. When they make up names to replace the actual cast. That's wrong. Ai Haibara in the Japanese version is not named Anita Hailey. Kogoro Mouri is not called Richard Moore. This list could go on.
When they remove the entire ethnic background of heroes so that only the heroes are no longer even Japanese, but all the killers and suspect are. That's border line bigoted. They are basically saying that only the hero can be European and do no wrong. All while saying that the Japanese are killers or suspects.
 
When VIZ makes the discussions to alter content. They are basically saying that they don't want the scanlation audience. This isn't something as minor as not using honorifics. I see those as more window dressing. Nice to have, but not really needed.
 It's a big steaming pile of %$#@ that VIZ keeps the proper names for series like Naruto and Bleach, but do nothing but drastic alterations of Detective Conan.
 
I wrote a blog entry where I explained why with these name changes to Detective Conan that a US translations will not be possible for a solution to a story in the series and have it make any sense.
 

A Case Explained

Whiskeyjackon June 25, 2010 at 12:33 p.m.
Scanlations of licensed property are illegal. There is still no justifiable reason for that theft. I find it impossible to believe that anything short of a Roboteching of a story could warrant turning to scanlations to get the "real" story. I don't want to come across that I'm not agreeing with the sentiment behind the unhappiness. I can't think of  anyone I know who's an active anime fan who doesn't want their translated versions to run as true to the original source, while still being comprehensible. However, none of that justifies scanlations still.
 

 If it's just a small hand full of fans, why are scanlations such a large problem then? It's not impractical to publish manga to what is the base audience of manga.

The raging purists are a niche within a niche. Scanlations are such a problem is because anime fandom expanded online where there's an obscene sense of entitlement to get whatever you like now, and for free. I'm sure there are still plenty of fansub/scanlation groups that do respect when a licensor purchases the rights to a show, they'll stop distributing their version. Then there were the little snots on the THORA site who, when Funimation asked them to stop posting up rips of series that they had the rights to, and had released, all flew into a whiny little rage. Nowhere in that discussion was there any sort of mention about the content of the translation - they simply wanted their free anime.

Are the changes that Viz makes to these titles so great that they are actually taking away from the overall enjoyment of the series? I have little to no interest in Conan or OP, but the changes made to these seem rather trivial.
FoxxFireArt moderator on June 25, 2010 at 1:59 p.m.
@Whiskeyjack: 
Yeah, what 4Kids did to One Piece was legal, but it was still god awful. They removed blood, cut out many canon story arcs, changed entire meaning of scenes, removed cleavage lines, and changed black characters into white characters.
It wasn't worth supporting. It was the equivalent of an anime war crime, and at the time it was the only option to the US. I put the blame of 4Kids for the poor reception of One Piece in the US. That was the countries first official introduction to the series.
Now that FUNimation got the license. They are far more authentic. They keep all the story arcs, don't tamper with the art, and offer subtitled versions where they alter next to nothing. That is worth supporting, and that is why most fan sub sites took One Piece off their catalogs. None of the fan sub sites I go to have One Piece after FUNimation got it and showed they were doing it right. They took them all down.
 
The argument in against scanlations is that its the scanlations that are getting facts wrong, but it's because the readers first experience with scanlations. They favor that as the standard.. That doesn't address the fact when publishing companies knowingly alter content that is story related.

The changes to Detective Conan are not trivial when it effects plot themes and events. Which it does often. There is no valid excuse why they alter this series, but not do the same to series such as Naruto and Bleach.
 
A "niche" is often times another term for "target audience".
 
VIZ does just and bad alterations to mangas as 4Kids did to anime.
Gozertcon June 25, 2010 at 11:31 p.m.

*Shrugs*  
 
I agree that they can try and do something about scanlations, but there's no way they're going to stop it.  Especially as the digitial distribution market increases.  
 
For instance I've not bought a Manga in... wow 6 years probably now.  Damn...  But I Have, and still regularly support webcomic authors and creators with purchases of their products.  I spend much of my time connected to a computer screen and being able to read comics there is my perfered form of media.   
 
Now if the Manga companies would jump on the iPad bandwagon with their own comic ap (don't have an iPad just using it as an illistration, so if they DO have one please tell me.  Make me want an iPad even more. :) ) where I can just go and read their work I'd be there in a heartbeat.  Hell I'm all for a subscription webpage where I can go and read the catalogues for a flat rate or something.  (That'd be ideal for me.)  
 
My point is ALL media formats have to adapt to the digital age and the digital distribution system.  There will be lots of misfires and false starts, but eventually we can find a balance between what's good for the creators and what the market will bear.  
BobCaton June 27, 2010 at 11:04 a.m.
When manga companies actually publish in more than one language at the beginning then scanlations will go away for the languages published.   That's the only solution.
YahwehTzVaothon July 1, 2010 at 2:25 p.m.
I read Ms. Patillo's column and posted this reply.  My ego compels me to post it hear. 
 

I would take issue with the section “It’s not available in my language!”   (Full disclosure, I don't read scanslations, not really.   I tried reading Death Note when it was scanned and not out in English.   While it is a very good read, it is no fun reading comics on a monitor.   No fun.   I got to volume 2 and said "that's enough."   I later bought the English books not out of any sense of morality, I just wanted to read them in a comfortable format.)

I tried to think of a nice way to put this, but I can't, the argument in section one is mornonic.

Let us operate under the assumption that Title X is written in Japanese and is not coming out.   By not coming out, I mean no English publisher has announced that they will publish it.   The older the series or more unknown the author, the less likely it will be licensed.   The proposed solution is to essentially buy the Japanese version – which our assumption admits is largely useless to the consumer – and hold it on a shelf until it gets published in English?   That is a waste of money.   I understand the idea of buying the author’s works that were translated, if any exist, but it makes zero sense to ask someone to buy something they can’t use on the off chance that it will convince the IP holder to later put that work out in their territory so the reader can buy it again.   I do not dispute that it is easy-ish to get in-the-original-Japanese manga in , but I do dispute that buying said product is any kind of solution.

Whenever I hear of a video game, manga, movie or anime that is not being brought out in any official capacity in , I always think one of two things: 1. That title has too many licensing issues to make it worth publishing (i.e. most Super Robot Wars games); more commonly 2. That publisher does not care about American sales.   A publisher has made the decision that it is not worth the effort of translation and republishing to try and put something out in .  

For my money, the response to the second issue is always the same: fine, then you, the publishing/artist, don’t deserve to see any money from that territory for that product.   If people put out a free, readable copy of something when there is no translated version available legitimately, then the IP holder shouldn’t be crying about lost sales because there are no real sales in that territory anyway.   At that point, I do not even see that free translation on top of a scan of an original as piracy, although it is my understanding that it does violate the law.

While a bit divorced form the issue – the principle is the same – Front Mission for the SNES was a game that was not brought out in until recently.   If you wanted to play it and read the text you could: A) buy a Super Famicom and the cart then learn to read Japanese or B) download a translated rom and play it on your rom player of choice.   Clearly Squaresoft thought it would not make business sense to translate a mech strategy game for when the game first came out.   So they didn’t get any money in the for that game until they put out a legit version for the DS a few years ago.   Did they lose revenue because some people said “I already played that, why would I buy it again?” probably.   But maybe part of the reason the put it out was they saw how many people were downloading the rom or discussing the game after playing the rom (more likely), “Huh, I guess there is more interest than we thought.” (That and its on the DS, and it’s a SquareEnix joint, and Front Mission brand now has some penetration in America after a PS1 and PS2 game).

I am just saying, it is hard for me to see a scanslation as stealing if it is not out in your area because it is not a sale that was lost.   The publisher never had that sale to begin with.

Obviously the totally legal solution to this problem is to learn Japanese.   But that is not really a realistic solution for the vast majority of native-English manga readers.   Since the issue of language in a global audience is the same across media, this is never really a solution.

The foregoing being said, I thought the rest of your points made sense and would agree with them.   The first section, not so much.

A ton of movies made in the good ol’ USofA are put out in other territories with either subtitles or movies because film companies want the box office cash (well, the licensing cash).   A lot of anime from has English subtitles on the disc, so its effectively available in . But when you read a free scanslation of something that probably will never see the light of day in your area, you are not taking money from a publisher.   You are robbing them of a potential sale that has been prevented from being due to a business decision made by the publisher.   It’s like kidnapping the idea of potential children from of a couple that uses condoms.   It doesn’t harm anyone.  

Unless its out in your country or will be coming soon, in which case you should buy it.    

Ziazanon Aug. 10, 2010 at 11:19 p.m.
 When I heard about Onemanga closing, I was dismayed.  Although I agree that it's not fair to the artists/mangaka's there are several reasons why I'm still a bit peeved.  For one, the scanlators were a lot faster at getting the chapters translated and put up than the publishers. It's kind of pathetic that a group of people online can get things done faster than an official publishing company.  
 Secondly, a lot of times the rarer less popular manga's can't be found here, so I fell like I'm missing out on something I might be really interested in. 
 
 Just wanted to add my two cents.

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Time for a giveaway folks! Now, act civil, we don't want anyone to get hurt in the mad rush to win.

Beginner's Guide to FLCL

Gainax's madcap, surrealist anime, broken down for new viewers.

Ballz Deep

Steve gets intimately close to Dragon Ball Z, for science!

Top 3 Awful Anime Dubs

Grit your teeth and get your ear plugs ready cause this week we're taking on the three most amazingly bad dubs of all time!

Does Anime Get Too 'Niche?'

THE VICE PIT. Sometimes, it feels like watching somebody else's home movies, doesn't it?

Anime Caption Contest! -- 8/18/14

Let's party hard at the beach while it's still summer!

Was KILL LA KILL Actually Any Good?

THE VICE PIT. With a few months of hindsight, Sam and Tom have very different takes on Trigger's bold series.

NARUTO Ch. 688 Review

No reason to be tense when you're working with a safety net.

Pick Anime Vice's Most Rockin' AMV! Part 3: Villains!

This month's AMV Tournament features villains! Submit your best Villain themed AMV!

Listen to the JOJO'S BIZARRE ADVENTURE Rap!

Richie Branson continues his weekly anime-inspired rap series with the hip-hop tribute "Stand-Up."

I'm Trying Really Hard to Like ALDNOAH ZERO #2

...but it's sooooo self-serious!

JOJO'S BIZARRE ADVENTURE : STARDUST CRUSADERS #20 -- Special Review

Eat poo... and die?

Pick Anime Vice's Most Rockin' AMV! Part 3: Villains!

This month's AMV Tournament features villains! Submit your best Villain themed AMV!

Anime Caption Contest! -- 8/18/14

Let's party hard at the beach while it's still summer!

Was KILL LA KILL Actually Any Good?

THE VICE PIT. With a few months of hindsight, Sam and Tom have very different takes on Trigger's bold series.

Does Anime Get Too 'Niche?'

THE VICE PIT. Sometimes, it feels like watching somebody else's home movies, doesn't it?

I'm Trying Really Hard to Like ALDNOAH ZERO #2

...but it's sooooo self-serious!

NARUTO Ch. 688 Review

No reason to be tense when you're working with a safety net.

Community Spotlight 8/15/2014

While many were preparing for the first week of the new school year, these users were deep into this week in anime.

What's the Appeal of GODZILLA Exactly?

After decades of kaiju calamity, why is Sam so jazzed about the announcement of GODZILLA 2 at Comic Con?

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