Guilty Crown User Reviews

Guilty Crown is an anime series in the Guilty Crown franchise
Write a Review 2 user reviews Average score of 8.3 / 10 for Guilty Crown
Guilty Crown: More than just a Familiar Tale Reviewed by colorbrandon on March 23, 2012. colorbrandon has written 5 reviews. His/her last review was for High School DxD. 20 out of 21 users recommend his reviews. 1 out of 1 user found this review helpful.

The Skinny

"Yuzuriha Inori, injured and on the run from authorities"
"Yuzuriha Inori, injured and on the run from authorities"

A young adolescent boy just wants to be left alone. He does not have many friends, but he is okay with that. On an ordinary day, at his ordinary secret hideout, he finds internet celebrity Yuzuriha Inori, injured and on the run from authorities. Swept into a world of violence and dystopia, Ouma Shu, the main-protagonist, finds himself caught up with the often misunderstood terrorist group, the Funeral Parlor, and its young leader, Tsutsugami Gai. Inadvertently, taking an experimental drug, the “Void Genom,” Shu gains the ability to manifest the hearts of others in the form of weapons and tools (voids). The scared and inexperienced Shu is hesitant about fighting, but with Inori’s support, he finds the courage to defend his friends, fight for his beliefs, and to shoulder the burden of everyone around him. “Believe. You can definitely do it. Because… I belong to you now.”

The Fine Line Between Inspiration and Plagiarism

As a reviewer, I almost feel obligated to point out a few of the more obviously borrowed themes and story beats.

Inori "drops in" to save Shu (Guilty Crown, Episode 4)
Inori "drops in" to save Shu (Guilty Crown, Episode 4)
One of the most hallowed scenes in anime history (Eureka Seven, episode 26)
One of the most hallowed scenes in anime history (Eureka Seven, episode 26)

I would argue that Guilty Crown's most criminal offense is how comparable it is to Eureka Seven, but this does the series no justice. I could continue to go on about how similar the two series are (Gekkostate vs Funeral Parlor, Gai vs Holland, Lost Christmas vs Summer of Love), but I would prefer to make another argument--that this anime series can be compared to a more well known story.

A bit on the nose, I'll admit, but I will leave it to you to figure this out.
A bit on the nose, I'll admit, but I will leave it to you to figure this out.

Bottom-line: This is not just a Eureka Seven clone. Believe me on this one, because its coming from someone who, from the bottom of his heart, wanted Guilty Crown to be.

Why Guilty Crown is Worth your Attention

Anyone that knows about my opinions on the state of the anime industry knows that I think its changing. Even though Guilty Crown has more than its fair share of Eureka Seven comparisons, some forget the sheer length of 50 episodes in one series. However, the short and sweet of it all is that Guilty Crown manages to do what Eureka Seven does in just 22 episodes. In a way this is story telling genius.

A Terrific Cast of Characters

Hare, a seemingly inconsequential character, proves to be pivotal to the story and Shu's development
Hare, a seemingly inconsequential character, proves to be pivotal to the story and Shu's development
Heartless characters like Daryl, has the ability to surprise the viewers
Heartless characters like Daryl, has the ability to surprise the viewers

Guilty Crown’s cast of lovable, hateful, and sympathetic supporting characters is what really differentiates the series from the rest of its contemporaries. It is not only the main character, Shu, who grows and learns life lessons. The writers are not scared to tackle difficult subjects like betrayal, greed, death, and envy. And the way all of the characters learn to cope with these hardships, in one way or another, is what makes everyone’s actions believable and human.

Tough as nails Ayase, refuses help from those she meets, despite being crippled waist down.
Tough as nails Ayase, refuses help from those she meets, despite being crippled waist down.

Guilty Crown's excellent story telling lies in the way it makes you absolutely hate a character until his or her motive is finally unveiled. In a kind of sadistic way, it challenges you to not feel compassionate and to not feel empathetic. And in this weird full-circle turn of events, Guilty Crown asks you express forgiveness, one of the more powerful story troupes throughout the 22 episodes.

A Respect for Song/Music

No words can express how well Guilty Crown uses music, literally no words. From the overall message that music can save lives to the grand concertos that accompany dramatic scenes of the anime, there is a devotion to song throughout the series that is unexplained. And in this case, it is better that its not.

A Unique Attention to Detail Towards Symbolism

Inori playing Manger Cradle (Cat's Cradle). Notice the different figures throughout the series.
Inori playing Manger Cradle (Cat's Cradle). Notice the different figures throughout the series.

Whether it is Gai's rosary or this obvious allegory to the biblical Adam and Eve story (don't worry that isn't much of a spoiler, but I'll hide it for those more prudent than most), Guilty Crown lives and dies by its symbolism, literally. There is so much to dissect in this series because of how open to interpretation everyone's actions are. And because the character's are so believably human, their arbitrary motives become fun mental exercises to tease out. While most mysteries are uncovered by the last few episodes, just enough to left to the viewer so that he/she feels engaged and not spoon fed.

The Score 4.5/5

In a world without Eureka Seven, 5/5? Sure. I cannot reward Guilty Crown as much as I would absolutely love to. There are a lot of things that Guilty Crown does right, but only because another anime series has already proven those to be so. But give credit where credit is due, Guilty Crown paints an exquisite, and nearly unrivaled portrait of dystopian science fiction. It is sometimes easy to forget that: "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery." (Ironic because imitation, as well as flattery, are keys theme of the story as well).

But the bottom-line is this:

Guilty Crown is a sincere and passionate tale that both draws from the classics and in some cases, improves upon them in profound ways.

Top Editors
Mandatory Network

Submissions can take several hours to be approved.

Save ChangesCancel