Learning japanese?

Topic started by Kane on Dec. 5, 2008. Last post by Resonate 5 years, 9 months ago.
Post by Kane (5 posts) See mini bio Level 1
So, what do you you guys think would be the best way to learn japanese, no schools around here teach it.  =(   Iv heard "My Japanese Coach" is a good aide, but what would be a good main source? also... the free-er-er the better, i am B-R-O-K-E!
Post by TPKLanzir (15 posts) See mini bio Level 1
College with a good foreign language program?
Post by Kane (5 posts) See mini bio Level 1

I cant really get into Collage atm, another other options?

Post by Devilly (5,329 posts) See mini bio Level 10

Nande? i suck my girlfriend makes fun of my crappy Japanese :P

Post by Black_Rose (1,204 posts) See mini bio Level 11
Pepsiman/Misaki made a great blog on GB with some tips. I'll try to find a link.
Post by Shingui_Takeda (199 posts) See mini bio Level 8
I picked up alot just by listening to unsubbed animes or songs. best way i did it was listening to Jrock i know its silly but i can now pick up alot more.

Readings more difficult but the one u asked about is the best ive heard about
Post by Kane (5 posts) See mini bio Level 1
hm...how does listening to it help?  you wont know what the words there saying mean?
Post by hazelnutman (142 posts) See mini bio Level 2
To be honest, it's really hard to learn the entire language via online lessons and stuff.

Hence, I'd invest some time and money in some classes that don't necessarily have to be from school. After learning the basics, phrases and words naturally get picked up when exposed to Japanese (via anime, media, etc).

Of course there's the option to live in Japan for a while (which I'll be doing for 6 months in 2010). More exposure = more knowledge.

Once you have that down, Japanese isn't as hard as other languages I've experienced. Good luck :)
Post by Black_Rose (1,204 posts) See mini bio Level 11
Post by WilliamRLBaker (16 posts) See mini bio Level 5
One thing you must understand is learning the language is far far removed from learning the writing...ect you are likely going to have a easier time learning the spoken language then you will the written.

There are alot of online sources availabile as well as listening to and watching anime...ect  Your best bet is to learn the spoken language first.
Post by Morganna (9 posts) See mini bio Level 1
Watching animes with subs really helped me learn some phrases in Japanese.
Plus, if you buy one of those "Learn How To Speak Japanese or Read" or something those help too!

=]
Post by Shingui_Takeda (199 posts) See mini bio Level 8
Kane said:
"hm...how does listening to it help?  you wont know what the words there saying mean?"
putting them to the english trans helps. yeah should have said that sorry

its how i figured out certain words. But it helped me mostly cause i listen too much lmao
Post by Desisashi (1,801 posts) See mini bio Level 8
Kane said:
"So, what do you you guys think would be the best way to learn japanese, no schools around here teach it.  =(   Iv heard "My Japanese Coach" is a good aide, but what would be a good main source? also... the free-er-er the better, i am B-R-O-K-E!"
i have 5 DVD's that teach you Japanese but i have not been able to catch on and to my shame i gave up on the first try
Post by Knil (18 posts) See mini bio Level 2
If you really want to teach yourself Japanese, I suggest you take a look at Tae Kim's guide to Japanese grammar here. I am still in the process of learning Japanese on my own, but the process I have found most efficient so far is this:

1. Memorize Hiragana
2. Memorize Katakana
3. Begin memorizing the meanings of Kanji by Japanese grade level (this is where I am right now)
4. Begin learning vocabulary and the pronunciations of Kanji in the context of words
5. Begin learning Japanese grammar
6. Practice by reading manga, raw anime, etc.

Really, it is a huge undertaking, and you will not get anywhere if you approach this as a hobby. Just so you're aware of what you're getting into in case you don't already know, here's a bit of info on the language. Hiragana is a set of 46 characters (71 with the muddied consonants) which make up the sounds in the Japanese language. Katakana is an alternate set of characters which represent the exact same sounds, plus a few more, which is used to make up foreign-derived words. These two are no big deal and should take only a week or two to memorize.

Then we have Kanji. You will need to know a total of 1945 kanji characters before you can be considered fluent in Japan. Each kanji character is not a word - it is a meaning, which means that it may take a up to a dozen equivalent English words to properly establish the exact meaning of the character. Also, characters may have several different meanings, and when you write them, there is a specific stroke order in which each one must be written. As if that isn't enough, each character has two different types of pronunciations (Onyomi and Kunyomi) and there are usually multiple pronunciations of each type, adding up to well over a dozen pronunciations for each character in some cases. Kanji and Hiragana are then strung together to form words, with the pronunciation of the Kanji being decided within the context of the word.

Once people learn this information, many of them are put off from learning the language, but really, anyone can do it as long as they understand that it will just take time. Japanese isn't a language you can learn fluently overnight, or over a few weeks, or even over a couple months or years. It's effort that takes time not just to learn but to remember and if you're serious about learning it, you'll have to plan to take the time to do it at a constant pace.

In order to teach myself Japanese, I have taken the time to make myself flashcards, trace sheets, and meaning/pronunciation lists for all the characters (I'm still working on getting the flash cards onto my phone). I really can't stress enough the importance of flashcards and trace sheets. Who knows, I just might post them here someday when I have the chance.
Post by maxwell (90 posts) See mini bio Level 6
I'm actually thinking of doing an Intro to Japanese video series. What do you guys think?
Post by Resonate (625 posts) See mini bio Level 7
gah, too much for me D:
Post by orz (114 posts) See mini bio Level 7
study abroad
Post by Kane (5 posts) See mini bio Level 1
wow...um...I did not realize it would be so hard, I really am glad you guy's helped me, i think i'd be ok with just bieng able to understand and speak it, I cant see many situations where i would need to write, I want to learn japanese mostely because anime, so mabey I'll just start watching undubbed along with "My japanese Coach" , thanks for all your help
Post by Rathany (81 posts) See mini bio Level 1
"You will need to know a total of 1945 kanji characters before you can be considered fluent in Japan."

In February 186 more kanji are being added to that list.  *sighs*   The more exposure you have to a language the better.  Watching anime is good for words and phrases, but I have never heard of anyone really learning grammar from them. 

Genki is a textbook often considered the best for people trying to do self study.  You might be able be able to get it used for not too much money.  But, keep in mind that different systems can have vastly different approaches to grammer.  I've studied from Genki, Youkoso and *shudder* JSL.  So, try to be aware of that and not get confused if you are learning from various sources like websites, a DVD system, a book, etc.  In some systems 'kamoshirimasen' is one word, in others it's considered 3. 
Post by Black_Rose (1,204 posts) See mini bio Level 11
maxwell said:
"I'm actually thinking of doing an Intro to Japanese video series. What do you guys think?"
That would be an awesome feature.
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