Anime Vice » Blogs

| |
(or, "Are they still on Namek?")

Okay, I'm convinced that this new season is a psychological experiment being perpetrated on all casual and hardcore fans of Haruhi. Basically, to see how long you can keep looping the same freakin' story over and over again to the point where people stop watching.

Sure, the first episode was good, classic Haruhi: A dash of ADD-related humor combined with nonsensical storytelling to lure both new and old fans into the series. In scientific terms, episode one acted as the "control" of the experiment. But then eps 2-5 are where the independent variables come into play, the part where the same episode is repeated with cosmetic changes here and there as part of an evil plot to discover how far they can stretch their fanbase until they snap (considering that some hardcore fans actually rented out hotel rooms in Saitama just to be the very first people to see the new season, I'd say pretty far). I told this to a couple friends who also watched the series, and one of them countered that the animation for each episode is different.

Skimming through each episode again, I tentatively agreed with him on that point. However, I said it didn't really matter to me so much as the fact that they basically repeated the same storyline over and over. It's kinda like the drunk guy at a party who tells a joke that he thinks is hilarious. You chuckle along with him at first, but then he thinks that if he says the same joke louder then he'll get more laughs, so he keeps raising his voice and telling the same joke over and over until you just want to dump what's left of your beer on his head and walk away.

Maybe the show will actually switch to a different plotline next episode, but I am not going to play along with their little experiment. I am not going to watch another episode of this series for the near future. The writers of this show shouldn't be allowed to get away with repeating the same story with only a few changes several times in a row. If I wanted that I'd watch Inuyasha, and at least then the characters might be different during the repeated plotlines.
| |
 The first part of the book has the a timeline to manga, anime and events in Japan and how it effected had in Japan and around the world from 1945-2004 of sorts. Here’s the timeline. 

1945: Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki lead to Japan’s surrender in World War II and American occupation. Manga, first post-war cartoon magazine, resumes publication. 











1946: New constitution. Sazae-san newspaper strip. 











1947: Shin-Takarijima or ‘New Treasure Island’ by Sakai Shichima and Osamu Tezuka published in Osaka, the first original manga in the akabon or ‘red-book’ format and a bestseller. Manga Shonen, founded by Kenichi Kotah, publishes new ’story manga’ artists. 









1948: New children’s magazines launched. News censorship ends. 

1949: Princess Beanjam. 











1950: Tezuka moves to Tokyo and draws Jungle Tatei or ’Kimba the White Lion’ in Manga Shonen, first ’story manga’ serialized in a manga magazine. Korean War starts.











1951: Us-Japan Security Treaty signed. 









1952: End of American occupation of Japan. Tezuka’s Astro Boy was serialized in Shonen magazine. Igaguri-kun jodo strip. 











1953: Princess Knight in Shojo Club, start of story manga in girls’ magazines. NHK begins broadcasting-but to only 866 TV sets. 











1954: Akado Suzunosuke, about a great swordsman who wears a red suit of armour, later adapted into films, radio and TV. Nakayoshi for girls. 








1955: Debut of Shotaro Ishinomori in Manga Shonen. Ribon and Nakayoshi monthlies for girls. 

1956: Giant robot Tetsujin 28 go aka ‘Gigantor’ by Mitsuteri Yokoyama. Yoshihiro Tatsumi and others set up Kage (’Shadow’) magazine for the rental-library market.

 









1957: Tatsumi coins the term gekiga for dramatic pictures. 

1958: US TV show Superman scores 74.2% ratings in Japan. 









1959: First boys’ weeklies Shonen Sunday and Shonen Magazine. Ninja Bugeicho by Shirato. 9 new TV networks begin. Wedding of Crown Prince.









1961: Tezuka sets up animation company Mushi Productions. 











1963: Tetsuwan Atom (’Mighty Atom’) by Osamu Tezuka is Japan’s first animated television series with regular characters. Screened as Astro Boy in US. Margaret for girls, Shonen King for boys. 









1964: Garo and Cyborg 009. Tokyo Olympics. 











1965: Jungle Taitei (‘Jungle Emperor’) by Osamu Tezuka becomes Japan’s first colour animated TV series.

 







1966: Star of the Giants baseball hit. Omiya Cartoon Art. Museum opens on site of Rakuten Kitazawa’s home. Shonen Magazine reaches 1 million copies. 

1967: Manga Action, Young and COM. The Genius Bakabon. 10 August, Lupin III debuts. 











1968: Weekly Shonen Jump and Big Comic. Nejishiki by Yoshiharu Tsuge in Garo. Tommorrow’s Joe and Shameless school. 

1969: Golgo 13. 











1970: Public funeral held for Tori Rikiishi, a character killed in Tommorrow’s Joe. Doraemon and Lone Wolf and Cub. 









1972: Mazinger Z, Devilman and Buddha. Rose of Versailles and Poe Clan revolutionize girl’s comics. Big Comic Original. 











1973: Black Jack and Barefoot Gen. Manga Erotopia, first erotic gekiga monthly.

 









1974: Yamagami Tatsuhiko’s crazy comedy GakI Deka (’Boy Detective’) creates a stir for it’s sexual themes. Space Cruiser Yamato, released as Star Blazers in the US in 1979.

 









1975: Princess and Flowers and Dreams for girls. Yumiko Lgarashi and Kyoko Mizuki’s Candy Candy in Nakayoshi becomes a big hit. 











1976: Penguin Food Passion by Terry Johnson and Itoi Shigesato, start of heta-uma or ‘unskilled/skilled’ punk style. Comiket, new fanzine market, begins in Tokyo. Galaxy Express 999 and Mask of Glass. Poem of Wind and Trees establishes ‘boys’ love’ genre. 











1977: Leiji Matsumoto’s Captain Harlock. CoroCoro, for young boys, stars Doraemon. Kindai Mahjong Original, first mahjong manga magazine.











1978: June, first ‘boys love’ magazine. Urusei Yatsura, aka Lum, by Rumiko Takahashi. Contemporary Manga Library: Naiki Collection opens in Tokyo. First English-language volume of Barefoot Gen by Keiji Nakazawa published in the US. 










1979: Young Jump. Le Cri Qui Tue, first manga translations into French. 

1980: Be in Love, first ‘ladies’ comic‘. Big Comic Spirits. Top 5 boys’ weeklies reach 10 million copies. 

1982: Akira by Katsuhiro Otomo released as a manga. Nausicaa and Captain Tsubasa. Morning Magazine for men. 











1983: Section Chief Kosaku Shima and Fist of the North Star. Black Magic, Masamune Shirow’s dojinshi debut. Manga! Manga! By Frederik L. Schodt, landmark US study. 











1984:Comic Baku and Combat Comic. Akira Toriyama’s Dragon Ball. Suehiro Maruo’s Mr. Arashi’s Freakshow. 











1985: Banana Fish and City Hunter. 











1986: Japan Inc. bestseller. Explains economics. Dragon Ball animated. 









1987: Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure and Crying Freeman. Big Comic Superior and afternoon for men. May: Lone and Cub starts translation in US. 











1988: Animated Akira by Katsuhiro Otomo released. Akira manga in English and ‘colorized’ from marvel Comics. Shonen Jump’s sales leap over 5 million copies. 











1989: Deaths of Osamu Tezuka, Suiho Tagawa and the Emperor. Akira published across Europe. The Silent Service political thriller.

 










1990: R.G. Veda by Clamp and Slam Dunk. Comic Amour, erotic ‘ladies’ comic’ magazine. A-ha, art manga sponsored by Esso Petroleum. Tezuka retrospective exhibition at the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo. 










1991: Gon, Gunsmith Cats and Ghost in the Shell. First pachinko manga magazines. Great Manga Exhibition at National Diet library, Tokyo. Radical Boredom manga exhibit at Pomeroy Purdey, London.











1992: Big Comic Gold. Visions of the Floating World exhibition at the Cartoon Art Museum, San Francisco. Sailor Moon. 











1993: Yan Mama Comic, manga of young mothers. 

1994: Detective Conan. Osamu Tezuka Manga Museum opens in Takarazuka. Shonen Jump sells 6.53 million copies, record figure.

 







1995: Manga book and magazine sales peak at over 2.3 billion copies. Evangelion manga and anime. Ghost in the Shell.

 










1996: Yu-Gi-oh! Us publishers TokyoPop founded.



 







1997: One Piece and Pokemon. 









1998: AX magazine, Vagabond and Love Hina. Chains of Manga cafes open. 











2000: Kyoto Seika University creates first department of comic art.

 






2002: 2.6 million copies of One Piece voloume, record first-edition print run. Shigeru Sugiura dies. December 18: Raijin, first US manga weekly. 









2003: April 7, Astro Boy awakes! Shonen Jump US monthly. Hayao Miyazaki’s Spirited Away wins Oscar for best Animated Film. Jiro Taniguchi wins awards at France’s Angouleme Festival. 











2004: January 13, Misshitsu pornographic manga ruled obscene. 

I hope you go out and buy this book.  It makes a good coffe table book and it's a good read.



| |
Name: Kiryu
Look: Elegant but deceptive, akin to Kira Yoshikage/Johann Liebert/Michio Yuuki




| |
Okay, so apparently the "Endless Eight" arc in the new season of Haruhi is set to continue until August sometime which really irks me. I mean, I thought that it was over and done with in todays episode. I guess it's staying true to it's title. Eight weeks of nonstop summer fun with the SOS Brigade over...and over again. Sure, it was quite enjoyable the first two or three times but c'mon, this is annoying. I get the idea, I really do. It's all part of the story right? Though seriously, does KyoAni really have to have EIGHT episodes for this one arc? What do you think, readers? Have you enjoyed this arc so far or has it become quite a bore after awhile, like it has for me?

What Kyon thinks of the "Endless Eight" arc shown Eight times over:


| |
http://moonstorm.podomatic.com/entry/2009-07-09T12_45_13-07_00
Join MoonStorm, Lunermoth, Red Roses, and Schwindelmagier. as we go cover anime vice and AX news.

Vanguard Princess is a good game and it's free so GO PLAY IT.

We get some eroge game coming to the US.

Kaiji is on a boat and on the big screen.

20th Century Boys is a trilogy.

New Gundam Movie.

New anime stuff.

Fist of the North Start licenses.

New Darker Than Black confirmed.
Brake Blades gets anime.
loli vampire anime.
Rumor on SZS and Moyashimon.
Kamen rider on Toonami
Moe tanks.

Japan Still wired and still likes its lolis

Arrested for rapelay.

Don't tase me hello kitty.

Toys Macross and Ranka.

Remember watch Haruhi on the net

Lastly anything AX

There too much to list.


| |

All Furuichi wanted was a beautiful wife, a nice house and lobster for dinner.
| |
VIZ MEDIA’S NEWEST IMPRINT, SHONEN SUNDAY,  
WILL RELEASE THE FIRST MANGA TO EVER BE PUBLISHED SIMULTANEOUSLY IN JAPAN AND NORTH AMERICA  

A New Imprint and Web Site Launch

Rumiko Takahashi’s Newest Series RIN-NE Gets Its First Volume  
 

San Francisco, CA, July 8, 2009– VIZ Media, LLC (VIZ Media), one of the entertainment industry's most innovative and comprehensive publishing, animation and licensing companies, has announced the launch of a brand new imprint, SHONEN SUNDAY. Featuring the works of some of the top shonen manga creators in the world today, the Shonen Sunday magazine in Japan provides the content for this imprint. The magazine recently celebrated its 50th anniversary since its first issue arrived on newsstands in March of 1959.  

The first series to launch from the first volume under this new imprint will be RIN-NE by Rumiko Takahashi, the first manga novel ever to be published simultaneously in Japan and North America, which will arrive on store shelves on October 20, 2009. Chapters of RIN-NE have been serialized online for free at www.TheRumicWorld.com on the same weekly schedule as it appeared in Japan’s Shonen Sunday magazine since May of this year. The Rumic World web site is the official North American destination for all Rumiko Takahashi-related news. 
 
VIZ Media will be announcing new Shonen Sunday series for 2010 at its Manga and Anime panel at the 2009 San Diego Comic-Con International on Friday, July 24th from 3:00-4:30 in Room 32AB. Other VIZ Media series that will move under the Shonen Sunday banner include INUYASHA, KEKKAISHI, CASE CLOSED, HAYATE THE COMBAT BUTLER, and YAKITATE!! JAPAN. Going forward, DVD products from the select series will also feature the Shonen Sunday imprint. 

The imprint’s web site (www.ShonenSunday.com) will be updated regularly with exclusive content such as previews, trailers, news, and interviews and will go live on July 22, 2009.  

RIN-NE by Rumiko Takahashi · VOL. 1 · October 20, 2009 · Rated T+ (For Older Teens) · $9.99 US/$12.99 CAN 

As a child Sakura Mamiya mysteriously disappeared in the woods behind her grandma’s home. She returned whole and healthy, but since then she has had the power to see ghosts. Now a teenager, she just wishes the ghosts would leave her alone! At school, the desk next to Sakura’s has been empty since the start of the school year, then one day her always-absent classmate shows up, and he’s far more than what he seems! 

RIN-NE is the first new manga from Takahashi since her epic INUYASHA (published domestically by VIZ Media) ended in 2008 in Japan. Shogakukan’s popular WEEKLY SHONEN SUNDAY manga magazine has featured Takahashi’s work since the early 1980’s. With over 170 million copies sold in Japan alone, Takahashi’s substantial catalog of work continues to be loved by legions of devoted readers.  

The spotlight on Rumiko Takahashi's career began in 1978 when she won an honorable mention in Shogakukan’s annual New Comic Artist Contest for Those Selfish Aliens. Later that same year, her boy-meets-alien comedy series, Urusei Yatsura, was serialized in Weekly Shonen Sunday. This phenomenally successful manga series was adapted into anime format and spawned a TV series and half a dozen theatrical-release movies, all incredibly popular in their own right. Takahashi followed up the success of her debut series with one blockbuster hit after another—Maison Ikkoku ran from 1980 to 1987, Ranma ½ from 1987 to 1996, and Inuyasha from 1996 to 2008. Other notable works include Mermaid Saga, Rumic Theater, and One-Pound Gospel. Takahashi won the prestigious Shogakukan Manga Award twice in her career, once for Urusei Yatsura in 1981 and the second time for Inuyasha in 2002. A majority of the Takahashi canon has been adapted into other media such as anime, live-action TV series, and film. Takahashi’s manga, as well as the other formats her work has been adapted into, have continued to delight generations of fans around the world. Distinguished by her wonderfully endearing characters, Takahashi’s work adeptly incorporates a wide variety of elements such as comedy, romance, fantasy, and martial arts. While her series are difficult to pin down into one simple genre, the signature style she has created has come to be known as the “Rumic World.” Rumiko Takahashi is an artist who truly represents the very best from the world of manga. 

About VIZ Media, LLC

Headquartered in San Francisco, CA, VIZ Media, LLC (VIZ Media), is one of the most comprehensive and innovative companies in the field of manga (graphic novel) publishing, animation and entertainment licensing of Japanese content. Owned by three of Japan’s largest creators and licensors of manga and animation, Shueisha Inc., Shogakukan Inc., and Shogakukan-Shueisha Productions, Co., Ltd., VIZ Media is a leader in the publishing and distribution of Japanese manga for English speaking audiences in North America, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and South Africa and is a global ex-Asia licensor of Japanese manga and animation. The company offers an integrated product line including magazines such as SHONEN JUMP and SHOJO BEAT, graphic novels, and DVDs, and develops, markets, licenses, and distributes animated entertainment for audiences and consumers of all ages. Contact VIZ Media at 295 Bay Street, San Francisco, CA 94133; Phone (415) 546-7073; Fax (415) 546-7086; and web site at www.VIZ.com. 

| |
I read AnimeVice since its beginning, but never wanted to take part in the community... time to change that! Hmm, I don't know what to write here, but I'm feeling like writing something... I think I'm gonna just introduce myself, right?

You know, everybody here in Brazil in their twenties grew up watching Rede Manchete, a TV channel that basically introduced japanese shows in the country in the late 80's. Everyboy watched Saint Seiya (it's an extremely revered anime in Brazil), YuYu Hakusho, Sailor Moon (no one even knew the meaning of shonen or shoujo, we just watched everything), Shurato, Captain Tsubasa... and even Tokusatsus like Jiraiya, Changeman and Kamen Rider Black. Good times that ended in the late nineties.

So the only thing I watched since then was Dragon Ball Z / GT and Rurouni Kenshin. And then last year the Naruto mania started here and, well, I can say that Naruto is what brought me back into anime. Damn, shounens have this power! So almost two years have passed now and I watched many things. The basics like Evangelion and Cowboy Bebop (my favorite). And Death Note, FMA, Code Geass, GTO, Nana and some others (just finished Lucky Star and it's AWESOME! ^^), with 150GB still waiting in my hard drive. Yes, I'm still a total noob and I can't recognize most of the cosplays at cons, but I'm really trying to improve my knowledge on the matter (and just started taking nihongo classes ^^). So, if you got any tips about good and not so obscure anime, please tell me!

Maybe I shouldn't talk that much about myself, right? I mean, who wants to read all that stuff?! So, just to finish this thing, I wanna say that Anime Friends, the biggest anime convention in Latin America, is gonna happen in the next two weeks (days 10-12 and 16-19). It's gonna be really cool, even though Hironobu Kageyama won't be here this year (he comes every year! JAM Project performed last year, it was amazing!). But we'll have Nobuo Yamada, Akira Kushida and Yukio Yamagata. Oh, and did I mention that those visual-kei guys from Kagrra will perform a concert? Yeah, I said it will be cool.

I'll probably post some pictures and maybe videos from every day of the show. We make some pretty good cosplay around here (actually, Brazil is the current champion of World Cosplay Summit). Well, that's it! Sorry for any typos and stuff, my English is not bad but not that good ^^ And I hope to meet some nice people here. Mata ne!

P.S.: gia, I love you. And GodLen rocks.
| |
In the pantheons of manga there is one genre that sets itself apart from the rest—sports. One of the oldest genres and arguably the most beloved, sports manga is often referred to as the champion of genres by editors and artists alike. Yet, despite its many accolades and international respect, sports titles have not yet hit a homerun with North American readers.  

 

Sports titles like Tomorrow`s Joe and Aim for the Ace helped lay down a foundation for Japanese pop culture back in the 60`s and 70`s. More than a decade later, Captain Tsubasa introduced manga to Europe and Latin America. And yet to this very day, many a sports manga contender has attempted to reach the Major Leagues of Comic-dom only to be relegated to playing a specialist role on bookshelves across America.

 

This Vednesday night Vertical’s own ballers will take to the field to pitch innings of unbeatable manga wisdom. Tackling everything from national pastimes to the new emergence of competitive eating comics, we will make a case as to why sports manga should be the undisputed world heavyweight comics champion!


Location: Books Kinokuniya New York (Café Zaiya, 2nd floor), 1073 Avenue of the Americas
Date: July 8, 2009 (Wednesday), 6:25pm-8:00pm

Drinks and snacks will be provided.
Please RSVP by emailing ed@vertical-inc.com

| |
You know what tomorrow is Wednesday and you know what I feel like doing, a podcast. That right people this Wednesday July 07, 2009 at 10 o'clock p.m. Central Standard Time. And we're always looking for the community of Anime Vice to join us.
It easy to join.
1 Have a mic (we also find the a RockBand mic works too cool)
2 Just get Skype, It free so, no worries
3. Set up a Skype ID
4 Then PM m, so I can call you for the show.
Or you can drop a message below.
| |
VIZ MEDIA’S NANA ANIME NOW AVAILABLE ON THE ITUNES STORE  


San Francisco, CA, July 7, 2009– VIZ Media, LLC (VIZ Media), one of the entertainment industry's most innovative and comprehensive publishing, animation and licensing companies, has announced today the availability of its popular shojo animated series NANA on the iTunes Store (www.iTunes.com) in the US and the iTunes Store in Canada (www.itunes.ca). NANA will be exclusive to iTunes until August 31, 2009. Plus, every purchase of a NANA Season 1 pass will include a free, bonus episode download. Find out more at www.itunes.com/tv/nana. 

The NANA anime is based on the popular manga by Ai Yazawa, which has sold over 43 million copies in Japan, and is published in North America by VIZ Media under its SHOJO BEAT imprint. It is considered an all-time best selling shojo title from Japanese publishing giant Shueisha, and was the recipient of the Shogakukan Manga Award in the Girls' category. Its tremendous success further inspired two live-action feature films which are available on DVD in North America from VIZ Pictures 

NANA follows the adventures of two girls, both named Nana. While they share the same name, they couldn't be more different. Nana "Hachi" Komatsu follows her boyfriend to Tokyo in the hopes of making a new start, while Nana Osaki, who arrives in the city at the same time, is a punk rock beauty who has the ambition of making it big in the world of rock and roll. Although these two young women come from different backgrounds, they quickly become best friends while chasing their happiness and dreams. 

Ai Yazawa is the creator of many popular manga titles, including Tenshi Nanka Janai (I'm No Angel) and Gokinjo Monogatari (Neighborhood Story). Another series, Kagen no Tsuki (Last Quarter), was made into a live-action movie and released in late 2004. American readers were introduced to Yazawa's stylish and sexy storytelling in 2002 when her title Paradise Kiss was translated into English. 

“NANA has touched millions of fans in Japan and North America with its realistic portrayal of two young women coming of age in life’s fast lane in modern Tokyo,” says Ken Sasaki, Vice President of Strategy & Business Development, VIZ Media. “The anime series possesses all of the attributes that made the original manga such a smash hit and combines them with a rocking soundtrack and creatively designed characters that audiences can really root for, laugh and even cry with. We invite fans to check out NANA on iTunes and take these girls’ adventures along as they navigate their own busy lives.”

What is Shojo?….In Japan, manga comics and anime have enjoyed widespread popularity among both children and adults, men as well as women. Shojo (which means young girl in Japanese) is widely known and embraced for their characteristic lush designs and tales of love and romance set against action, academic, or fantasy driven plots. Women and young girls in North America quickly discovered that comic books and anime are no longer just for boys and shojo stories appeal to the desires for stories and characters girls and women can relate to. While plots and settings for shojo vary widely (everywhere from outer space to alternate realities to the local middle school), several constants remain the themes of romance, angst and heartbreak, and ultimately finding the one you love despite obstacles and setbacks. And what young girl isn't interested in that? The fact that shojo is largely an entertainment medium developed by women for women with stories women and girls can relate to is also driving the popularity of shojo in North America.

For more information on NANA (rated ‘M’ for mature) please visit the dedicated website at Nana.viz.com or the VIZ Media website at www.viz.com. 

About VIZ Media, LLC

Headquartered in San Francisco, CA, VIZ Media, LLC (VIZ Media), is one of the most comprehensive and innovative companies in the field of manga (graphic novel) publishing, animation and entertainment licensing of Japanese content. Owned by three of Japan’s largest creators and licensors of manga and animation, Shueisha Inc., Shogakukan Inc., and Shogakukan-Shueisha Productions, Co., Ltd., VIZ Media is a leader in the publishing and distribution of Japanese manga for English speaking audiences in North America, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and South Africa and is a global ex-Asia licensor of Japanese manga and animation. The company offers an integrated product line including magazines such as SHONEN JUMP and SHOJO BEAT, graphic novels, and DVDs, and develops, markets, licenses, and distributes animated entertainment for audiences and consumers of all ages. Contact VIZ Media at 295 Bay Street, San Francisco, CA 94133; Phone (415) 546-7073; Fax (415) 546-7086; and web site at www.VIZ.com. 

| |
ESCAFLOWNE MOVIE Blu-ray TO BE RELEASED IN U.S. IN SEPTEMBER!
July 7, 2009 – Bandai Entertainment Inc. announced today that it will release the Escaflowne

movie Blu-ray on September 15th.

Originally released in 2002 from studio BONES, the movie was directed by Kazuki Akane,
features the music of Yoko Kanno (Cowboy Bebop) and is based on the successful television

series The Vision of Escaflowne created by Shoji Kawamori (Macross).

The story centers on Hitomi Kanzaki, who is tired of life. Depressed and despondent, she wishes
that she could just fade away, to make the pain of living stop hurting. Her pain resonates with
another on the world of Gaia, and when her wish is granted, she finds herself in a strange land.
She is greeted as the legendary Wing Goddess, with the power to summon the legendary
Escaflowne. Hitomi’s fate is intertwined with the brash young warrior king Van, who also feels
that life has lost its meaning. By summoning Escaflowne, the Wing Goddess will choose a path

for Gaia’s future. But will it be salvation…or destruction?

Specs include Dolby TrueHD 5.1 Japanese and English audio, English subtitles, cast and staff

interviews. SRP $39.98

About Bandai Entertainment Inc.
Bandai Entertainment Inc. is a subsidiary of Namco Bandai Holdings (USA) Inc. and the premier distributor
of Japanese animation on DVD and programming for television broadcast in North America. Titles include
Code Geass Lelouch of Rebellion, Gurren Lagaan, The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, Cowboy Bebop, Outlaw Star,
Escaflowne, Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, Gundam Seed Destiny, My Hime, and many more.


| |
VIZ MEDIA ANNOUNCES THE U.S. PREMIERE OF BLEACH THE MOVIE 2: THE DIAMONDDUST REBELLION AT VIZ CINEMA IN SAN FRANCISCO FOR TWO NIGHTS ONLY

Newly Launched VIZ Cinema To Debut Feature Film Based On Smash Hit Anime Series

San Francisco, CA, JULY 7, 2009 – As announced this past weekend at the Anime Expo® 2009, VIZ Media, LLC (VIZ Media), one of the entertainment industry's most innovative and comprehensive publishing, animation and licensing companies, will celebrate the theatrical engagement and U.S. premiere of BLEACH THE MOVIE 2: The DiamondDust Rebellion, for two nights only. Two showings each day, on August 18th and 19th 2009. The special screenings will be held at the brand new VIZ Cinema, located inside NEW PEOPLE – San Francisco’s newest entertainment destination.

 

Tickets for BLEACH THE MOVIE 2: The DiamondDust Rebellion (rated ‘T’ for teens) go on sale Friday, July 31, 2009 at www.vizcinema.com. NEW PEOPLE and the VIZ Cinema are located at 1746 Post Street in San Francisco’s Japantown and will open officially on August 15th.

 

Adapted from the wildly popular animated series and best-selling BLEACH manga series by acclaimed Japanese creator Tite Kubo (both distributed and published in North America by VIZ Media), BLEACH THE MOVIE 2 continues the action-packed adventures of Soul Reaper, Ichigo Kurosaki. In the newest feature film, after the treasured Ouin is stolen, Toshiro Hitsugaya disappears and becomes suspected of treason. When the Soul Society calls for his capture and execution, Substitute Soul Reaper Ichigo Kurosaki vows to prove Hitsugaya's innocence. Will the secret of the Ouin and Captain Hitsugaya's motives be revealed before his honor, his life, and the Soul Society are destroyed?

 

VIZ Media is scheduled to release the DVD of BLEACH THE MOVIE 2: The DiamondDust Rebellion (rated ‘T’ for teens) on September 8th.

 

“This two day event will be very exciting as it marks the U.S. theatrical debut of BLEACH THE MOVIE 2: The DiamondDust Rebellion and also the opening week of the brand new VIZ Cinema,” says Brian Ige, VIZ Media Director, Home Entertainment. “BLEACH is one of the most popular and successful manga and animated properties in the world and we encourage fans to go online and get their tickets early as this event will likely sell-out!”

 

BLEACH is a tremendously successful multimedia property internationally. The manga series has been licensed to more than a dozen countries, and has sold over 52 million copies in Japan alone. In North America the manga has been a sales hit and the popular animated series is viewed weekly by millions in the United States and Canada. This success has further spawned an array of related video games, apparel, action figures, trading cards and other merchandise. For more information on BLEACH and BLEACH THE MOVIE 2: The DiamondDust Rebellion, please visit the official BLEACH website at bleach.viz.com or www.viz.com. BLEACH episodes can also be viewed on the SONY PlayStation VIZ Media channel, online at hulu.com and also on iTunes.

 

VIZ Cinema is a 143-seat underground cinema located inside NEW PEOPLE in San Francisco, part of the J-Pop Center Project produced by VIZ Pictures. Equipped with cutting-edge HD digital projection and a THX®-certified sound system, VIZ Cinema is the soul of the NEW PEOPLE experience. Its programming focuses on the latest and hottest films from Japan, as well as an incredible legacy of classics, favorites, documentaries and anime – making it the only venue of its kind in the United States. For more details on the cinema and its programs, visit www.vizcinema.com.
 
About VIZ Media, LLC

Headquartered in San Francisco, CA, VIZ Media, LLC (VIZ Media), is one of the most comprehensive and innovative companies in the field of manga (graphic novel) publishing, animation and entertainment licensing of Japanese content. Owned by three of Japan’s largest creators and licensors of manga and animation, Shueisha Inc., Shogakukan Inc., and Shogakukan-Shueisha Productions, Co., Ltd., VIZ Media is a leader in the publishing and distribution of Japanese manga for English speaking audiences in North America, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and South Africa and is a global ex-Asia licensor of Japanese manga and animation. The company offers an integrated product line including magazines such as SHONEN JUMP and SHOJO BEAT, graphic novels, and DVDs, and develops, markets, licenses, and distributes animated entertainment for audiences and consumers of all ages. Contact VIZ Media at 295 Bay Street, San Francisco, CA 94133; Phone (415) 546-7073; Fax (415) 546-7086; and web site at www.VIZ.com.


| |

My name is Issac.  I'm a tall well-built machine of a man with a super-computer installed into my brain, controlled by my thoughts.  The left side of my face is covered by a metal plate that also houses  a cybernetic eye, which hides a link hub to the super-computer.  I wear dark fatigues with a combat jacket and usually wear a gunmetal grey armored cloak.  I carry a vast array of weapons, including grenades of various types, twin custom heavy-barrel cutlass pistols with exploding rounds and a semi-auto combat shotgun, a shirasaya wakizashi, a mid-weight axe and several combat blades, all suitable for both close combat and throwing.  I'm a wanted man, fleeing the Syndicate (a grand unification of the worlds major crime organizations, who now rule the majority of the planet with an iron fist) with my partner Cronos and our comrades backed by the Russian mob and joined by the leader of the Russian mob and the Russian people, Vladimir Rovchovsky and his daughter, the beautiful assassin Natalia.  Joining our cause are a couple of ex-military anti-Syndicates, Captain Terrin Evayne and his right-hand man Kuric.  Our enemy Angello is the head of the Italian branch of the Sydnicate, and as such is the head of the entire European branch.  He aspires to gain absolute control of all of the Syndicate, and crush what little resistance remains in this world.

| |
VIZ PICTURES LICENSES THEATRICAL AND DVD RIGHTS TO 20th CENTURY BOYS

TRILOGY OF LIVE ACTION FILMS FROM JAPAN

 

Critically Acclaimed Movies Based On Smash Hit Manga Series Created By Naoki Urasawa

To Open New VIZ Cinema In August

 

San Francisco, CA, JULY 7, 2009 – VIZ Pictures, an affiliate of VIZ Media, LLC that focuses on Japanese live-action film distribution, has announced that it has licensed from Nippon Television (NTV) the North American theatrical and DVD distribution rights to the live-action 20th CENTURY BOYS feature film trilogy from Japan. The films are based on the critically acclaimed 20th CENTURY BOYS manga series created by Naoki Urasawa, which is a national phenomenon in Japan, selling over 20 million copies to date.

 

VIZ Pictures is scheduled to release the first and second chapters of 20th CENTURY BOYS films on DVD later this year, with the remaining film scheduled for release in 2010. VIZ Media publishes the 20th CENTURY BOYS manga series (rated ‘T+’ for older teens) in North America and will also distribute the DVDs. For more information about these DVD releases, please stay tuned at www.viz-pictures.com.

 

On August 15th, VIZ Cinema will celebrate its grand opening at NEW PEOPLE, located at 1746 Post Street in San Francisco, with a very special screening of the first chapter of the 20th CENTURY BOYS live-action trilogy, presented in partnership with Nippon Television. Advance tickets go on-sale on Friday, July 31st and more information is available at www.vizcinema.com. 

 

The first 20th CENTURY BOYS film will continue playing at VIZ Cinema for the next week, followed by a week-long showing of the second chapter of the trilogy. As an unprecedented event in the Japanese film world, VIZ Cinema will host the world premiere of the third and final chapter of 20th CENTURY BOYS on August 28th, presented simultaneously with the national release in Japan.

 

The 20th CENTURY BOYS saga was directed by Yukihiko Tsutsumi (HAPPILY EVER AFTER, also available from VIZ Pictures) and begins in 1969 when a young boy named Kenji and his friends write “The Book of Prophecy.” In their book, they write about a future where they fight against an evil organization trying to take over the world and bring about Doomsday.

 

Years later in 1997, a mysterious cult being lead by a man only known as “Friend” has emerged and gained strong influence over society. A series of catastrophic events begin to occur, mirroring the prophecies made up by the young Kenji. The greatest fear is that the climax of The Book of Prophecy will become a reality: on December 31st, 2000, a terrifying giant virus-spreading robot will attack the entire city of Tokyo, leading to the end of mankind. The only people who know about The Book are Kenji and his childhood friends. Who is Friend? Will Kenji and his friends are able to save mankind and live to see the 21st Century?

 

“We are truly honored to announce the license for 20th CENTURY BOYS features and look forward to premiering the films at our new VIZ Cinema later this summer,” says Seiji Horibuchi, President and CEO of VIZ Pictures. “20th CENTURY BOYS was one of the biggest productions ever attempted in the Japanese movie industry and was created in-part to celebrate Nippon Television’s 55th Anniversary. Anticipation has risen steadily in Japan in the wake of the success of the first two films and since the upcoming release of the final film of the series was announced. We’re very excited to premiere the third and final film to U.S. audiences at VIZ Cinema the same day it debuts in Japan.”

 

About VIZ Pictures, Inc.

Based in San Francisco, CA, VIZ Pictures, Inc. distributes Japanese live-action films and DVDs, with particular focus on Japanese "kawaii (cute) and cool" pop culture. VIZ Pictures approaches each release from a J-pop fan's point of view to serve manga and anime generation in North America. VIZ Pictures titles include DEATH NOTE, HAPPILY EVER AFTER, KAMIKAZE GIRLS, LINDA LINDA LINDA, PING PONG, THE TASTE OF TEA, TRAIN MAN: DENSHA OTOKO and others. The company will continue to offer the hottest visual entertainment straight from the "Kingdom of Pop" for audiences of all ages in North America. VIZ Pictures, Inc. is an affiliate of VIZ Media, LLC, the San Francisco-based leading U.S. publisher of Japanese manga (comics) and merchandise licensor of Japanese animation such as the popular "NARUTO" animated TV series. For more information please visit www.viz-pictures.com or www.viz.com.© 2006 VIZ Pictures, Inc.

| |
  
| |
After having my last blog post with my cosplay choices, I've decided to pick Tsumugi Kotobuki from K-On!~ So, to go with my new cosplay in-the-making, I made my profile avatar/header/profile pic to match. It's weird going from Yoko to Mugi but hey I'll get used to it. I think.


Thanks to all who have viewed my Yoko cosplay updates! I hope you enjoy the next series of cosplay bloggin' <3

So now I'm in a slight dilemma. Which version of Mugi should I do? At first, I was going to do the "Don't Say Lazy" ED version but then I stared at her hair... it's in a weird, funky bun so I'll pass. I have no idea how I'd do that. At least with Yoko, I could just do a ponytail cheat thing but I don't think I can cheat a hair bun.

Losty (Agent_Lost) has kindly reminded me about the retro outfit that appears on episode 6. It's quite a summer-y outfit if I do say so myself. For those that don't know or remember, this episode is about the school festival. While they perform, the scene cuts to them performing on outdoors stages while running away from cops.

So now, onto my two choices: School uniform versus retro outfit! DUN DUUUN DUUUUUUUN.


I like both outfits so I'm not sure which one to do. Yes I could do both but I'd rather stick with one for now. If I find it in me, I'll do both. They both are relatively easy to do so that isn't a factor at all. So which version should I do, retro or uniform?
| |
alright I'm up at 1 in the morning and bored. I found this site trying to see where I can start a cloud cosplay. After seeing Trauma's cosplay picture of Zack I knew I could hopefully find help here. So begins my quest lol.
| |
"My God, I'm surrounded by kids"

That was my first thought as I scanned the bridge.  So, this is my crew.  Not a one of them was older than 20.  Hell, these pups weren't even born yet when I cleared the academy and got my first commission.  

It was bad enough, losing the Sunrise Horizon, and two ranks (how was I supposed to know she was the Admiral's daughter?) but to then be busted down to a patrol ship, a Snooker-class Imperial Rocket Bomber, and left in a backwater system to babysit a bunch of raw recruits -- not even academy grads, yet, and some of them might never be accepted there.  If we survive.

"Captain Blind, sir?"

I'm guessing she's my first officer then.  

"not a captain"  I mumbled, voice still a little raw from last night's bourbon.  I cleared my throat.  "I'm not a captain anymore," I said, as I tugged my collar, to show off the small orb, and two star emblems.  "They took my starburst.  The rank is lieutenant commander; you kids can call me _Commander_ Blind, or skipper."

I cringed a bit inside.  I'd slipped up, actually called them kids.

No one seemed offended though.  That goofy looking bastard at the pilots station is even grinning back at me.

"OK, Skipper!  What's our heading?"

I ignored him, and turned to my first:  "Lieutenant, set a course for the dark side of the third moon.  We're going to hang out in the shadows for a bit until my head feels better."

I went over to my station, and settled in to the rather worn leather chair.  I pulled an old Benton pipe out of my pocket and clamped it between my teeth, while settling my uniform cap a bit lower over my eyes.

"Some tea would be excellent. Does anyone know if we have black current tea on this bucket?  That, and a painkiller.  Lieutenant, scare up an ensign or a JG who can make that happen for us."  Leering a bit from under the brim of my cap, I added, "and pull up a chair, miss; we haven't properly been introduced."
Mandatory Network

Submissions can take several hours to be approved.

Save ChangesCancel